My plugin gets added to WordPress core!

WordPress 3.5 was released yesterday. After upgrading my site, I checked the editor screen and noticed a tiny tweak that made me smile. It looks like my humble suggestion finally made it in to WordPress core.

Screen Shot 2012-12-11 at 11.59.41 PM

Notice the Add Media button… it’s an actual button! The previous version of the button looked like this:

The old Upload/Insert button or link

It was an easily overlooked text and icon combo labeled “Upload/Insert” . This caused problems for users as I’ve discussed beforeI don’t know if this small change to a more clickable and noticeable “Add Media” button happened because I suggested it, but I’m glad it’s there. So after suggesting this usability improvement to the WordPress core team, their developers took notice and made it happen.

WordPress-usability-improvement-ticket

Thanks, WP devs. Also, I didn’t suggest the name change, but good choice on the new wording from “Upload/Insert” to “Add Media”. Much better.

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Button It Up version 1.2 released

With the release of my first public WordPress plugin last month I received encouraging nods and tweets from the community, as well as some constructive feedback. One user requested a very specific set of changes:

Paris,

Thanks for making this plugin! After reading your article a while ago, I went and wrote this exact plugin but luckily found yours before I submitted it to the repository. No need for more than one of these.

I checked out the plugin and discovered one bug and a few ideas 🙂

The Bug

  • You’re styling the div#wp-content-media-buttons rather than a#content-add_media. That leads to ALL media buttons (like the Gravity forms icon) to show up in one weird integrated “button.” See here: Weird button with Gravity Forms.
  • If you change the element you’re styling to the link instead, you’ll also catch the Quick Press’s “Insert Media” button which is currently unstyled. It’s tempting to style ALL links in that row, but I’d shy away from that on the chance that other plugins style their own buttons.

Some Tweaks

  1. Style-wise, I wish the :hover and :active states more closely matched WordPress’s defaults.
  2. To get really nit-picky, the WordPress admin button’s have a border-radius of 11px.
  3. To make things a little more WordPress friendly, I’d use wp_enqueue_styles() hooked to the admin_enqueue_scripts hook to register the stylesheet.

So thanks again for making the plugin. If you incorporate these changes, I’ll definitely be adding it to all my client sites.

All of these tweaks made sense, so I’ve released version 1.2 with the above changes included. Download Button It Up 1.2 from the WordPress Plugin Repository to try it out, or from within the plugins section of the WordPress dashboard.

I hope these changes make the plugin more useful, usable and even desirable to the WordPress community. I look forward to more feedback.

How to rip the faces off WordPress hackers… their cheeto-encrusted life-sucking evil faces.

How to deal with website hackers

  1. Find hacker that attacked your site and destroyed the efforts of your labor.
  2. Insert hand grenade into hacker mouth.
  3. Pull pin.
  4. Kick in the nuts.
  5. Run, laughing as their head explodes.

If that doesn’t work, here are some plugins to protect your WordPress site from future hacker evil.

I use all of these plugins on my sites. Each plugin has different settings you can adjust to achieve varying levels of security. Be careful and do plenty of testing as you go. Be especially mindful when you’re restricting access to directories within WordPress. Some directories need to have open access so that other plugins or WordPress functions can work properly.

Here’s more on what to do if your site has been hacked: